Do I Really Need HDMI?

HDMI is an acronym for High Definition Multimedia Interface. With an HDMI output, you’re able to take the signal out of your digital video device, such as a DVD player, into your TV without having any alteration or loss of data.
 
HDMI is an acronym for High Definition Multimedia Interface. Normally, when you are transferring a video signal that is digital from the source to your television, the source needs to take the signal from digital to analog. This will cause some degree of data loss, and your picture and audio will suffer slightly.

 With an HDMI output, you’ll be able to get the signal from your digital video device, such as a DVD player, into your TV without having any conversions or data loss. This will give you a much more pure video information transfer from your source to your HDMI TV. Furthermore, your HDMI can handle both audio and video outputs. This means that you always have one less cord going from your device to your TV – always a plus.

HDMI is able to handle resolutions of video from 480i up to 1080p. Keep in mind that every video device maker will decide what amount of data that their device or TV can handle.

HDMI is used on TVs, audio receivers, DVD players, Blu-Ray players, cable boxes and satellite boxes.

HDMI also has ways to provide HDCP, which is High Definition Copy Protection. This means that content providers have ways to stop their property from being copied illegally.

You may adapt HDMI to a Digital Video Interface by using an adaptor cable. But, the video device with the DVI adaptor needs to be enabled for HDCP for the transfer of signal to work right.

Over the years, we have witnessed numerous versions of HDMI that engineers have manufactured. In every case, the actual connector on the devices are the same, but the properties of the content have changed somewhat.

Which version of HDMI you have depends on what device you purchased and when. All new versions of HDMI within the last few years are working with older versions. Also, you are able to use the new versions of HDMI with products that have older kinds of HDMI. You cannot make use of all of the additional features, though.

Some versions of HDMI are:
•    1.0 – this has a signal of digital video combined with an audio signal with two channels over one cable, such as a TV and a DVD player.
•    1.1 – this type added to handle Dolby Digital and DVD audio surround. Also, 1.1 can use as much as 7.1 channels of audio PCM.
•    1.3 – this has improvements for capabilities in the transfer of audio and video.